Because of the glorious Lord Jesus Christ, true life now—and eternal life forever—is yours to know and enjoy. What the Scripture reveals about Him is worth more than all knowledge, all riches, and all happiness in this world.

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We are located on the University of Hartford campus. Please join us this Sunday! For information, call us at (860) 285-7422.
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The ministries of the church are an integral part of the plan of the Lord of the Church, Jesus Christ.   Read more

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Lay up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where neither moth nor rust destroys and where thieves do not break in and steal. For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also. Matthew 6:19-21

Most Recent Blog Entries

From the Law of Ceremony to the Law of Christ (Acts 9:32-10:16)

Following is a reflection by David Alves, one of our members, on the sermon preached by Tim Knotts on August 21, 2016.

We have just studied Paul’s conversion, call to apostleship, and the beginnings of his ministry. Acts 9:19-26 covers the time from Paul’s conversion to his first visit to the apostolic team in Jerusalem, a period of about three years (Gal. 1:17-18). The bulk of this time seems to include an extended season of personal preparation by the Lord for apostleship and church ministry in Arabia, a region near Damascus. Read more

Sovereign Mercy Makes an Apostle (Acts 9:1-31)

Following is a reflection by David Alves, one of our members, on the sermon preached by Tim Nash on August 14, 2016.

Because Christ knew His earthly ministry would only be a finite period, He appointed men to be His emissaries and carry on His work in the world. They were fully invested with His authority and could speak for Him, on His behalf. The most familiar of these to readers of the gospels are the twelve apostles. What is a bit ironic, however, is that the apostle who wrote the most, possibly had the most extensive and visible ministry, and is one of most visibly associated with Christianity is Paul, who never met Jesus in His earthly ministry and so calls himself an “untimely” apostle (1 Cor. 15:8). The one who arguably did the most to spread the gospel, give Christianity its definitive and inscripturated shape, contributed the most to the body of doctrine (including some of the most fundamental doctrines, like justification), is a former persecutor whom the risen Lord personally appeared to, commissioned, and set apart, years after His earthly ministry. Read more

The Gospel Penetrates the Nations (Acts 8:26-40)

Following is a reflection by David Alves, one of our members, on the sermon preached by John Cheffer on August 7, 2016.

In Genesis 11:1-9, the descendants of Noah’s family settled in a plain of Shinar, which was likely a region in northeastern modern Syria. Here, instead of continuing to spread throughout the whole world as God had commanded to repopulate the earth after the global Flood (cf. Genesis 9:1), they chose to sink down roots and build a massive tower—likely, a ziggurat, or a tower designed by pagans in the Ancient Near East as a worship center that would unite heaven and earth. In order to circumvent this stealing of His glory, the Lord confused the common language of the people so they could no longer communicate. The people then coalesced into distinct groups and eventually migrated to different parts of the world (which is what the Table of Nations in Genesis 10 concerns). However, Moses writes several thousand years after Babel that God divided these nations “according to the number of the sons of God” (Deut. 32:8 ESV), while the nation of Israel would be His covenant possession (v. 9; cf. 4:19-20, 29:25-26, 32:17; Psa. 96:5 [“idols” = “demons” in LXX], 1 Cor. 10:19-21, Eph. 6:12). “The sons of God” are the “gods” of Psalm 82—high-ranking angelic beings responsible to administer God’s affairs over His world, but who rebelled and became demons, and led the nations in ignorance and darkness (Psa. 82:5). God judged the nations of the world for their rebellion at Babel. But He promised Abraham that through him One would come who would bless all the nations of the world (Gen. 12:3). Read more

“Stephen’s Ministries: Tabernacle and Martyr” (Acts 7:44-60)

Following is a reflection by David Alves, one of our members, on the sermon preached by Tony Luna on July 24, 2016.

Since creation, God has desired to dwell and fellowship with His people. Because people are created to be physical, earthly beings—we are not fully human if we do not have a soul and a body, and so any attempt to devalue or denigrate the physical is a lie from Satan—the kingdom of God has always been an earthly phenomenon. As such, God has often seen fit to assign His presence to aspects of the physical creation. The clearest example of this was when He gave the tabernacle and later the temple to His people Israel. But by Jesus’ day, the temple had taken on an ungodly significance in the life of the nation. Read more

“Stephen’s Ministries: The Man and the Messenger (Acts 6:8-7:53)

Following is a reflection by David Alves, one of our members, on the sermon preached by Tony Luna on July 17, 2016.

Throughout the book of Acts, a repeated emphasis has been placed on two things: the activity of the ruling, risen Christ through His apostles to accomplish His program, and the preciousness of the Bible—then just the Old Testament—to the early church. On this latter point, it is most evident the earliest believers were Bible-saturated people, as the Scriptures easily weave in and out of their preaching and prayers like one would expect from those who knew them intimately. The lengthy narrative which focuses on Stephen in Acts 6:8-7:60 is no exception, as these themes are heavily present. Because of the length of this section, it is divided into three parts. This week focused on the man (6:8-15) and the messenger (7:1-53), while next week will focus on the martyr (7:54-60). Read more

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